take a look at your life's avatar

take a look at your life

hatzigsut

railmilk:

hatzigsut:

very chilling topic on twitter right now. 

i have my own reasons for #WhyIStayed, and looking through this hashtag, i can see so many women and men who were lost, just as i was.

i stayed because it was the first time i felt important to anyone. he “loved” me. when he said he would die if i left him, i thought it passionate. when he started showing up unannounced at my house, because my friends told him my brother’s friends were over, i thought the jealousy was endearing.

then he tried to kill himself when i left town for two days. he was convinced that i would find someone else, in a town where i knew no one. i came back home, and promised i would never leave.

the manipulation and emotional abuse became physical—but only once. he slammed me against a wall after i made a joke about dumping him once i started college. i hid the bruises from my family, for weeks. that was the moment i decided to get out, no matter what happened. for some people, it only takes one time. others need more than one. and some people never make it out alive.

it is not always easy to “just leave.” it is a blessing if you are able to leave, with no consequences.

important

(via unrealisticandnarcissistic)

punkypunk
bosxe:

perfectvic:

LITERALLY MY FAVORITE

This is so much better than any russian roulette or “poison cookie” analogy.

bosxe:

perfectvic:

LITERALLY MY FAVORITE

This is so much better than any russian roulette or “poison cookie” analogy.

(via queenofokay)

hecallsmepineappleprincess

poly—nesian:

hecallsmepineappleprincess:

Here’s that post about my cosplay I was telling you about.
Granted I had already said previously I had only gone off strictly off the concept art for moana.
Also something to note is that moana won’t be out for another 3 years and we have little to no knowledge about her except that she’s polynesian and she comes from a family of explorers.
I mean if you think I was wrong please tell me but it’s a cosplay.
That’s all.

coming from someone who is actually polynesian, i totally feel the girl telling you that you’re wrong.

it’s frustrating as fuck having people not only dressing up as your culture but also doing it wrong. if you’re going to do it at all at least do it right and don’t blame others when you get called out.

questionall

(via kiwianaroha)

afro-dominicano

ohheysarahc:

glitterlion:

afro-dominicano:

reminder that ya boy bill gates (along with his bill and melinda gates foundation) invest in the very private prisons that create a demand for more black/brown bodies

ps. Melinda Gates/the foundation has an obsession with figuring out how to control the reproductive decisions of African women, particularly in Ethiopia and Nigeria.

Holy fuck this is true
http://m.motherjones.com/environment/2013/12/gates-foundations-24-most-egregious-investments

(via teamhydrate)

princetanaka

dylanthescientist:

princetanaka:

just a small town girl. Living in a racist, insensitive, sexist, homophobic world,

(cant take the midnight train ‘cause im fuckin scared)

(via dibsonthescifi)

cielito-lindo
women of color between the ages of 36 and 49 have, on average, $5 in assets compared with white women’s $42,600, according to a report by the Insight Center for Community Economic Development.

Michel Martin, On balancing career and family as a woman of color (via cielito-lindo)

(via unrealisticandnarcissistic)

naomicampbelle

inmydreamsperhaps:

black—lamb:

lawdtoday:

kobetyrant:

A PROPHET

!!! yes @ I don’t want white people claiming me

THIS

(via unrealisticandnarcissistic)

shedresseskindaprochoice
For many New Zealanders in the lowest 50 per cent, the picture is not one of wealth but of debt: the 200,000 poorest (in wealth terms) owe a combined total of $4.7 billion. No one in the poorest fifth of New Zealand owns more than $6000 in assets. The typical household has a net worth of just under $70,000. Between them, the entire lower half of the country’s adults, some 1.45 million people, own just 5 per cent of all wealth, around $23 billion. In other words, the wealthiest 1 per cent of New Zealanders together own three times as much as is owned collectively by the poorest 50 per cent of the population

Max Rashbrooke: “Inequality and New Zealand”, Inequality: A New Zealand Crisis, ed. Max Rashbrooke, 22. (via shedresseskindaprochoice)

(via angieisawesome)

popcrimes
popcrimes:


"The queen of rap, slayin’ with Queen Bey"

Nicki and Beyonce off to conquer Rome or something.

popcrimes:

"The queen of rap, slayin’ with Queen Bey"

Nicki and Beyonce off to conquer Rome or something.

(via chromysome)

shedresseskindaprochoice
Many on low incomes in New Zealand would be still worse off if they had not been working increasingly long hours since the 1980s. According to one recent study, the extra hours worked by low-income staff in the 1980s and 1990s were so great their incomes kept pace with those of their higher-paid counterparts, despite their actual hourly wages falling significantly behind.

Max Rashbrooke: “Inequality and New Zealand”, Inequality: A New Zealand Crisis, ed. Max Rashbrooke, 29 (via shedresseskindaprochoice)

(via shedresseskindaprochoice)

shedresseskindaprochoice
Article Three of the Treaty of Waitangi states that Māori, as citizens of New Zealand, should have the same rights and privileges as British subjects. Yet, if we view rights and privileges as extending to such things as having the same life expectancy and improving levels of infant survival, enjoying the same health status, earning similar incomes, experiencing comparable living standards, and so on, we can clearly see that these rights and privileges have never been fully realised by Māori. And it is clear that Pacific migrants too have never enjoyed the same rights and privileges as those experienced by other New Zealanders.

Karlo Mila, “Only One Deck”, Inequality: A New Zealand Crisis, ed. Max Rashbrooke, (2013) pg 92 (via shedresseskindaprochoice)

(via anarchacannibalism)

shedresseskindaprochoice
For many New Zealanders in the lowest 50 per cent, the picture is not one of wealth but of debt: the 200,000 poorest (in wealth terms) owe a combined total of $4.7 billion. No one in the poorest fifth of New Zealand owns more than $6000 in assets. The typical household has a net worth of just under $70,000. Between them, the entire lower half of the country’s adults, some 1.45 million people, own just 5 per cent of all wealth, around $23 billion. In other words, the wealthiest 1 per cent of New Zealanders together own three times as much as is owned collectively by the poorest 50 per cent of the population

Max Rashbrooke: “Inequality and New Zealand”, Inequality: A New Zealand Crisis, ed. Max Rashbrooke, 22. (via shedresseskindaprochoice)

(via shedresseskindaprochoice)

shedresseskindaprochoice
New Zealand has five times the teenage pregnancy rates of countries such as Sweden and twice as many obese people as countries such as Norway: these are both countries with more equal societies - that is, less income inequality, or smaller gaps between high and low incomes.

Max Rashbrooke, “Why Inequality Matters”, Inequality: A New Zealand Crisis, ed. Max Rashbrooke, 13. (via shedresseskindaprochoice)

(via shedresseskindaprochoice)

shedresseskindaprochoice
New Zealand has between 170,000 and 270,000 children living in poverty (depending on the measure used), and one of the world’s worst records of child health and well-being, with alarming rates of preventable diseases amongst children. Children in New Zealand are more likely to be poor, and less likely to feel safe and well, than children in most other developed countries. One major report on children’s welfare ranked New Zealand twenty-eighth out of thirty developed countries, better only than Mexico and Turkey. In particular, our rates of preventable diseases, especially among children and the elderly, have been described as a ‘national embarassment.’

Max Rashbrooke, “Why Inequality Matters”, Inequality: A New Zealand Crisis, ed. Max Rashbrooke - 2 (via shedresseskindaprochoice)

(via lady-giolla)